motive.

why.

We are hospitality professionals who are proud of where we come from and want to be in touch with that.

We are hospitality professionals who are proud of where we come from and want to be in touch with that.

We believe in the uniqueness of the Australian landscape and significance of local flavours across the globe.

We believe in challenging ignorance, celebrating variety and supporting creativity.

We believe in sharing knowledge, passion and culture for the generation that follows us.

We believe in striving for sustainable industries considering impact on the environment, community and self.

We believe in supporting and understanding where our food and beverage comes from in a time where money and corporate contracts dictate how we learn and what we consume.

how.

Unite Australian producers on a level playing field that celebrates their authentic collective brand and benefits them by promoting the Australian independent category.

Challenging the current climate that is dominated by brands with large marketing budgets and give tomorrows bartenders’ solid foundations to grow as unbiased educated professionals.

Promote discussion, thought and content on the use of Australian produce, products, sustainability concepts in food and consumerism within the boarder commercial hospitality community.

Promote discussion, thought and genuine connection between where our food comes from, how it gets to us, those that produce it and those that consume it.

Promote discussion, thought and content on the significance of relationships. Namely Australian agricultural produce, Australian agricultural producers, local makers and craft people, people in commercial hospitality settings and consumers.

what.

PRODUCTS AND PROJECTS

A targeted educational program presenting curriculum outlining the significance of celebrating where we come from with what we serve and the unique flavours available to us

An interactive workshop discussing food and beverage industries, food production, consumerism, and our place in the global food supply system

A structured journey through the Australian landscape of produce, producers, wine makers and distillers, and flavours special to this environment

A showcase of products and producers from a variety of local settings to encourage consumerism of local ingredients and craft products

A relevant look at what is unique at our disposal as industry professionals, and practical application of how to use and why we should use it

Content orientated around story telling influencing consumerism focussing on Australian independent producers and makers:

  • You-Tube Chanel OR web series
  • Presence on virtual training programs
  • Social media content
  • Regular fresh produce seasonality reports targeted at Bartenders
  • Creating a global movement that truly celebrates local flavours and independent products through relationships and international promotions
  • A travel show with a variety of perspectives that discusses the importance of local flavours, sustainability, and supporting local independent makers with chefs, bartenders, journalists, celebrities providing content for consumers to relate to and be inspired by.

a taste of place.

INTO:

This piece looks to cover the fundamental origins of how we apricate the industries of food and beverage. It also looks to outline the importance of understanding the significance of place as individuals striving for independent opinion and appreciation of their trade. For example, by understanding the significance of where our food comes we can look to appreciate more what’s in our very own back yard, enjoy what comes from afar in greater depth and embody a more autonomous local industry.

Terroir (tare-wahr); A French term commonly associated with wine that can simply be described as “The Taste Of Place”. Stemming from the Latin word terra meaning earth, connections can be made to terrain and territory.

Terroir is something experienced every day yet is not discussed or related to within the bar world very often at all. It is a simple idea that the natural environment can impact dramatically on the world of gastronomy and what we consume as food and beverage.

The significance of the Australian Terroir and its place behind the bar are topics not often embodied but are ever so important to the identity and progress to the Australian Bar industry. When tasting and discussing gastronomy we often remark on flavour notes and envision likenesses and paring suggestions or cocktail constructions. It is relevant to understand that these conversations are threaded together by taste and ultimately a connection with origin. For example, “blackberry notes” in the red wine “stone fruit” in the brandy, “dry grass” in the tequila or pairing a white wine with fish served with lemon and ginger tend to remain as technical terminology reserved for “wine guys” rather than being grounded in agrarian culture or practical application for bartenders as professionals often fail to connect at all with any unique origins of their produce.

Origin is encapsulated with in all elements that occur before arriving at the loading dock. Climate, conditions and geology, ingredients and their source, overall techniques used by generations of local technicians and crafts people, barrel aging and barrel material, place of production, and storage all denote a signature.

FRANCE:

When looking to translate terroir from French it is hard to derive a direct translation that encapsulates all its total meaning. When attempted, alternate translations such as soil, locality, or “part of the country” are derived. The term Terroir is firmly embedded in French culture and this can suggest why it is difficult to translate. It is an everyday assumption about food that the French hold.

A tradition held for centuries, the idea is that when eating you are ingesting nature and with that comes the taste of earth. This taste then signifies pleasure and a further desired good or even preference. It is an opportunity to celebrate the agrarian (rural peasant) life that is so central in French culture. For example, Cheese made by the same breed of cow at the same time but in two separate valleys by different farmers can denote two very different end products.  Due to the valley conditions and farming techniques each cheese is differentiated, respected and celebrated as unique and different.

The French people as well as policy makers look to preserve this amazing heritage with the creation of denomination of origin, or the compilation of terroir recipes through the National Program for Food. Controlling laws set by The Appelation D’origine Controlee (AOC) also denote origin and the identity of gastronomy.

AUSTRALIA:

Max Allan goes into great detail to explore what terroir means to Australia and its historical place in our own cultures. Reaching out to indigenous communities he discovers great links between the French concept of Terroir and the Aboriginal beliefs and language surrounding “belonging to land”. While again there is no direct English translation words like “Pangkara” of the Kaurna people of the Adelaide plains and “Beek” of the Boon Wurung people of Victoria make great links to celebrating the uniqueness of land or terrain. He goes further to discover that words like “ngooleek” make a close translation to “belonging to land” a concept and belief strong in the indigenous cultures of Australia.

Australia celebrates a unique connection with its land and the agrarian culture that works off that land. Our wine industries, produce industries, native produce industries, dairy industries and sea food industries have championed this topic for years to great success across the country. Our land is rich with human history and geological uniqueness. For example estuaries, beaches and lagoons, grasslands and woodlands, freshwater lakes, rivers and swamps, temperate rainforests and tall dry forests have encapsulated micro climates and made for unique fertile lands that have supported mankind for over 60 thousand years.

Much of our economy survives off the exploitation of these unique lands and micro climates. The rise in the spirits industry has now introduced another player to field that celebrates where we come from with great ambition. With little standing in our way around restrictive AOC like laws and tradition we find ourselves in a position to capitalize on what is available to us and experiment with our techniques and local produce.

amaro & friends.

Maidenii

  • Origin: Heathcote / Bendigo, Central Victoria, Australia
  • Producer: Gilles Lapalus & Shaun Byrne
  • Kinfolk: Maison LAPALUS (Bertrand Bespoke Wine), Marionette Liqueur
  • Production: Wine, Vermouth, Amer, Liqueur
  • Website: https://www.maidenii.com.au/

Maidenii is a collaboration between French wine maker Gilles Lapalus and Australian bartender Shaun Byrne.

At the time of conception there was no Australian Vermouth on the market. Shaun and Gilles wanted to fill this niche to showcase Australia’s unique native botanicals.

In its creation, Maidenii uses fresh wine with no added caramel or sugar plus sources leaves, flowers, fruits, herbs, seeds, spices and roots for both contemporary and classic expressions within their vermouth and amer . The vital components, wormwood and wine, are from central Victoria. Other key ingredients include strawberry gum, river mint, sea parsley and wattle seed showcasing Australia’s plethora of native botanicals.

Over the last few years, Maidenii has grown from a boutique product available only to a few select bars into an awarded and sought after premium spirit distributed globally.

Maidenii Nocturne Amer 21.5%

maidenii-nocturne

Nocturne combines mature wines from Central Victoria with indiginouse botanicals create this premium Amer.

Wormwood plays a key role, supported by nine native botanicals with a strong focus on Australian bush fruits including muntries, riberries, desert limes & quangdongs. Four other bittering botanicals are blended in with the final botanical; Yarra Valley black truffles from the 2015 season!!

The base wine and botanicals are blended for a six month maturation in old French oak. Sweetened with grape concentrate & bottled without filtration. Nothing else added.

Tasting note: [2016 edition] Pale, slightly cloudy salmon pink / autumn leaf orange. Pure and intense aromas of pink grapefruit and a gently bitter medley of fresh herbal notes; complex in the mouth, and seamlessly integrated.

Applewood distillery

  • Origin: Gamaracha; Adelaide Hills, South Australia
  • Producer/Distiller: Applewood Distillery / Brendon and Laura Carter

Being wine makers Ben and Laura have a strong connection to the soil and the taste of place unique to where they reside. Embracing native ingredients and paying homage to the agrarian and indigenous cultures of Australia they hope to introduce a new audience to what they see as unique to Australia and its people.

Applewood Distillery Okar Amaro 26% [2017-2018]

okaramaro

Applewood Distillery’s Okar is an Amaro – a type of bitter/herbal aperitif that have been popular for more than a century – famous for it’s use in the Negroni or Spritz. Riberries alongside Davidson Plum, Finger Limes, Lemon Myrtle, Saltbush, Rivermint, Peppermint and Strawberry Gum Leaves are just a few of what makes up the Okars botanical recipe.

Tasting: Deep cherry red with crimson edges. Powerful, fresh bitter-herbal bouquet evokes semi-ripe blackberries, mint, thyme and citrus peel with later passes accenting blackcurrant and lime juice. Drinks as a silky, medium bodied amaro with attractive fruitiness countered by a surge of bay leaf, peppermint, citrus peel and delicately bitter, drying, herbal tea-like notes at the finish. The salt bush brings savouriness and is present throughout.

Poor Toms’

“Imbroglio” aperitivo bitters.

“Imbroglio”: an extremely confused, complicated, or embarrassing situation.

This bitter/sweet Australian Amaro is a natural leap for the Poor Toms team, Imbroglio shares much in common with Gin in technique and intent. Individually distilled Seville orange and mandarin plus ten more familiar Gin ingredients. Added to the mix 13 steeped herbs, fruits, and vegetables (including gentian, wormwood, strawberry gum, and beetroot), the product is fresh and herbaceous with earthy notes. Notably less sugar than other comparable products but still carries great flavour. Sitting well in contemporary versions of classic aperitifs or simply on its own over ice.

fortified.

Maidenii

  • Origin: Heathcote / Bendigo, Central Victoria, Australia
  • Producer: Gilles Lapalus & Shaun Byrne
  • Kinfolk: Maison LAPALUS (Bertrand Bespoke Wine), Marionette Liqueur
  • Website: https://www.maidenii.com.au/

Maidenii Vermouth is a collaboration between French wine maker Gilles Lapalus and Australian bartender Shaun Byrne.

At the time of conception there was no Australian Vermouth on the market. Shaun and Gilles wanted to fill this niche to showcase Australia’s unique native botanicals.

In its creation, Maidenii uses fresh wine with no added caramel or sugar plus sources leaves, flowers, fruits, herbs, seeds, spices and roots for both contemporary and classic expressions . The vital components, wormwood and wine, are from central Victoria. Other key ingredients include strawberry gum, river mint, sea parsley and wattle seed showcasing Australia’s plethora of native botanicals.

Over the last few years, Maidenii has grown from a boutique product available only to a few select bars into an awarded and sought after premium spirit distributed globally.

Maidenii Classic Vermouth %16

Maidenii Classic Vermouth %16

Base: Syrah from Central Victoria.

Along with Maidenii’s staple botanicals of strawberry gum, sea parsley, river mint and wattleseed, Maidenii Classic Vermouth showcases orange zest, bay leaf & gentian root.

Tasting note: Deep copper colour. A powerful aroma reveals scents of clove, bay leaf and cherry with hints of anise adding freshness. A slightly tart, bitter entry leads into a medium bodied, almost off-dry profile of stewed fruits and sweet spices counterpointed by pleasantly bitter, herbal, earthy, root like flavours and cleansing acidity. Excellent balance. Spicy blackberry finish. Concludes clean, fresh and mildly tart with bay leaf and clove.

Maidenii Dry Vermouth %19

maidenii-dry-vermouth

Base: Viognier from Central Victoria.

Along with Maidenii’s staple botanicals of strawberry gum, sea parsley, river mint and wattleseed, Maidenii Dry Vermouth features kaffir lime leaf, nigella and Japanese gentian.

Maidenii Dry was created with the martini in mind. However the versatility of this style means that it is just as delicious drunk straight.

Tasting note: Pale straw gold colour. Perfumed aromatics open with a fruity / herbaceous burst that includes bay leaf, clove, indian spices and more over a fresh and fruity base wine. The fruitiness comes to the fore after exposure leaning towards stewed apricot / fruit mince pie. The palate is lean, light yet with good depth opening spicy with a dried citrus peel and apricot burst before turning deliciously nutty, spicy and refreshingly acidic towards the finish. Finishes bone dry and lightly bitter with gentian along with hints of clove and a medley of flavours reverberating.

Maidenii Sweet Vermouth %16

maidenii-sweet-vermouth1

Base: Cabernet from Central Victoria.

Along with Maidenii’s staple botanicals of strawberry gum, sea parsley, river mint and wattleseed, Maidenii Sweet Vermouth boasts grapefruit, mace and angelica root. Makes for a unique Australian Negroni.

Tasting note: Bright crimson / cherry appearance. Moderate aroma issues an attractive combination of citrus peel and black fruits with subtle herbaceous undertones. A soft, silky entry is followed by a light to medium bodied mid palate with semi sweet flavours of blood orange and sweet spices. Finish is gently acidic and cleansing –  not overly sweet . Concludes with refreshing grape fruit and dried berry notes followed by a gently bitter fade.

Maidenii La Tonique Quinquina 17.5%

maidenii-quinquina

Base: Viognier from Heathcote Victoria.

Cinchona bark, lemon gum, finger limes, Victorian green tea

This aromatised wine is produced from Heathcote Viognier grapes. Similar to their vermouths, they use a blend of botanicals, plenty of citrus, and of course, they finish it off with deliciously bitter cinchona bark. A logical extension to the outstanding Maidenii range this Quinquina aperitif is suitable as a solo show over ice or with others in a classic or contemporary mixed beverage.

Tasting note: Pale straw colour with water like edges. A l lift to the aroma with bright notes of grapefruit, thyme, cool mint and delicate quinine. Fresh entry followed by flavours of semi-ripe apricot, pink grapefruit and a delicately bitter, vibrant dried herb / quinine / mint finish.

Castagna

  • Origin: Beechworth Victoria, Australia
  • Producer: Julian Castagna / Castagna Wines
  • Products: Biodynamic wines, vermouth
  • Website: http://www.castagna.com.au

With an intention to make, as simply as possible, wine which is an expression of the place where it is grown. The Castagna Vineyard is situated at an altitude of 500 metres five-and-a-half kilometres outside the beautiful town of Beechworth in Northeast Victoria, high in the foothills of the Australian Alps. their soil consists mainly of decomposed granitic-loam on a base of clay. The climate is distinctly Mediterranean with hot days and cool nights during the important part of the growing season. The land is farmed biodynamically; using Rudolf Steiner’s biodynamic principles, with a drive to achieve optimum fruit quality that best expresses its terroir.

Max Allen comments, “It’s no coincidence boutique vermouths have started appearing at the same time as the boom in Australian boutique gins – what better partner is there for gin than vermouth, and vice versa?”

Castagna Classic Dry Vermouth 17%

castagna-classic-dry-vermouth

This is reputedly Australia’s first 100% estate grown Vermouth, with all the ingredients sourced from Castagna’s property. Based off a Shiraz Rose and containing 30 botanicals.

Tasting note: Slightly cloudy, pale salmon pink. Sweet oregano and grapey, semi-sweet yet fresh opening notes are underscored by a gently bitter herbaceousness. Aeration accents grapefruit and tarragon. Light to medium bodied with pink grapefruit followed by a yeasty, bready, bay leaf / sage finish concluding gently bitter, dry and delicately herbal finish. A subtle style for easy drinking and cocktails.